Washington, DC

March 20 - April 16, 2017

NCBF Cherry Blossoms NCBF Cherry Blossoms

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Learn about symbols from Japanese culture and create scenes from the National Cherry Blossom Festival through coloring pages!

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Paper Petals

Paper Petals

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Cherry Blossom represents spring and new beginnings. Celebrate the start of the season by making your own cherry blossom flower out of recycled materials.

Teru Teru Bozu

Teru Teru Bozu

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These good weather charms are traditional Japanese dolls made out of white cloth. Children typically hang these dolls in their window to bring good weather….especially before festivals.

Daruma Doll

Daruma Doll

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The Daruma Doll comes from a Japanese legend of Daruma, a Zen Buddhist. In the legend, Daruma sat in a cave meditating for so long that he lost the use of his arms and legs. Today, people often buy Daruma Dolls when they want to achieve a goal. They write their goal on the back of the doll and color in one eye. When the goal is achieved you can color in the second eye.

Kites by the Washington Monument

Kites by the Washington Monument

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Create your own scene of kites by the Washington Monument inspired by the Blossom Kite Festival. Each March, the National Cherry Blossom Festival plans the Blossom Kite Festival to celebrate kite flying traditions from around the world. Thousands of people come and fill the sky with kites and enjoy the day.

Cherry Tree

Cherry Tree

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Color and create a cherry blossom tree you might find at the Tidal Basin.

Koi Fish

Koi Fish

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Koi or carp are a Japanese symbol for overcoming life’s difficulties. These fish are the national symbol of Boy’s Day or Children’s Day in Japan. On Children’s Day, children and their families fly carp-streamers outdoors. Koiribori or the carp windsocks flying high in the sky represent carp fish swimming upstream. Parents hope that their children will overcome obstacles, like the fish, and grow up to be healthy adults.

Setsuban Mask

Setsuban Mask

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Setsubun celebrates the coming of spring. Traditionally, in order to ward of illness and misfortune, Japanese families open their doors and throw roasted soybeans. One person wears a mask representing a demon and everyone shouts, “Oni wa soto! ( “Out with the demons!”) , and “Fukuwa uchi!” (“In with good luck!”).

Cherry Blossom Oragami

Cherry Blossom Oragami

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Origami is the traditional Japanese art of paper folding. Follow the instructions to make your very own cherry blossom!

Blossom Haikus

Blossom Haikus

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This form of Japanese poetry is all about moods, seasons and is tons of fun to write on your own!

Picnic Checklist

Picnic Checklist

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Spring is the perfect excuse for a beautiful picnic at any of the gorgeous parks in DC. Here’s a checklist to get you started!

Woodblock Printing

Woodblock Printing

Play Games

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Create Art

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Explore Presentations

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Resources

Cherry Blossom Junior Ranger

Complete a National Park Service Activity Book

National Park Service

Learn about cherry blossom care

Arbor Kids

Resources from Casey Trees

NGAkids Art Zone

Resources from the National Gallery of Art